Search
Close this search box.

The complete guide to Arm-Lifting finger strength training

Enjoying the site? Please subscribe to the Premium Content to support it!

Introduction to Arm-Lifting finger strength training

Finger strength training is essential if you want to improve your climbing. It has been shown to reduce injury risk by exposing the fingers to supramaximal loads in a controlled environment and to improve performance by allowing you to climb harder and more frequently 1www.youtube.com/@c4hp, Finger Strength Training 4 Rock Climbing (No Hanging Required!), Sept. 6, 2023. (link). The traditional method of building finger strength is deadhanging, and that's not without reason. All you need is a hangboard and perhaps a few weights, and you're good to go. Moreover, countless fingerboarding protocols, like the MaxHangs or the 7/3 Repeaters, have been developed to build finger strength and forearm endurance 2J. Banaszczyk, StrengthClimbing – Eva López MaxHangs Hangboard Routine For Finger Strength, Apr. 29, 2019. (link)3J. Banaszczyk, StrengthClimbing – Hangboard Repeaters strength endurance protocol, Apr. 8, 2019. (link).

However, an alternative finger strength training method called Arm-Lifting or Block Pulls has recently gained popularity. Initially, Arm-Lifting was used for pinch training to isolate the thumb more effectively. If you're hanging from two pinch holds on a hangboard, you will produce additional force by pressing on the holds from outside, which takes the load off the thumbs. Lifting loaded pinch blocks forces you to squeeze with the thumb, which makes pinch training more effective. Still, it was only after some time that climbers realized they could also use this method for regular edge training.

The exercises themselves are not specific. The adaptations we get from them are.

At first glance, fingerboarding seems more climbing-specific because hanging off an edge resembles rock climbing. However, according to Dr. Tyler Nelson, the exercise itself doesn't have to be climbing-specific - the adaptations it produces must be climbing-specific! Furthermore, hanging involves a complex kinetic chain, so other factors outside your finger strength, such as your lock-off strength or shoulder stability, could be limiting. Arm-Lifting isolates pure finger strength from other muscles, arguably having advantages and drawbacks. Moreover, Arm-Lifting also allows for a lot of creativity in programming and offers slightly different training adaptations than regular deadhanging. Finally, instead of lifting weights, you can use a climbing dedicated dynamometer, such as the Tindeq Progressor, to take your Block Pulls to the next level 4tindeq.com/product/progressor (link)!

Arm-Lifting - the new approach to finger strength training

For years, climbers have effectively trained finger strength using deadhangs, so why should you try Arm-Lifting? First of all, Arm-Lifting adds variety to finger strength training. That alone can be a benefit since it's often possible to make progress by simply changing the training stimulus. However, there are also other factors worth considering.

According to pro climber and coach Dan Beall, Arm-Lifting can make training on small edges and challenging holds feel less risky and more approachable 5www.youtube.com/@HoopersBeta, How to Train Finger Strength for Climbing [Block Pulls Guide], Apr. 24, 2023 (link). One reason is that you don't have to worry about sudden dry-firing from the hangboard and hurting yourself. Second, if you can't deadhang on a given hold, you don't need a pulley unloading setup to reduce your bodyweight. With Arm-Lifting you can easily adjust the training load and make even mono training possible.

Equipment required for Arm-Lifting

Regarding the training equipment for Arm-Lifting, in principle, you only need a pulling block and some training load. Any type of block can work, and you can easily make your own. In order to make the training comfortable and easier on the skin, it's good to make sure that the edge is slightly rounded. For edge training, I use the Tindeq Progressor V-Rings 6tindeq.com/product/v-rings/ (link). They come with three edge depths of 19 mm, 12 mm, and 7 mm. However, many other blocks are available on the market, such as The Block from Tension Climbing or the V-Mobs block that Yves Gravelle uses 7tensionclimbing.com/product/the-block-2/ (link)8shop.blocshop.com/products/v-mobs (link)9www.youtube.com/@LatticeTraining, YVES UNCUT, Feb. 27, 2023 (link).

The next thing you need is a training load and lots of it. For me, that's one of the most significant drawbacks of Arm-Lifting training. To effectively train with an 18 - 20 mm edge, I would need 60 - 70 kg of weight plates, and that's a considerable investment unless you're ready to rely on the equipment at your local climbing gym. Fortunately, this issue can be overcome by using a dynamometer, such as the Tindeq. The cost is comparable, and you get much more bang for the buck. For small edge training, where I need less load, I can still use a bucket filled with sand and some weight plates placed on top of it, but I find the Tindeq indispensable for training with 20 mm edges.

If you have enough weight plates and decide to use them for training, consider buying a loading pin. It makes the load much easier to handle. Just ensure the pin length is not too long — otherwise, it may force you to shrug your shoulder while lifting, which is a common mistake. Finally, you can get some scrap from the junkyard and stuff it in a bucket, but that seems like a bit of a hassle, and you need to make sure that nothing sharp sticks out that could hurt you.

Arm-Lifting training edge size

Now, let's get into edge size selection for training. In the Hooper's Beta video, Dan claims that the best carryover to climbing is typically achieved with the 10 mm edges, but he doesn't really explain why this is the case. Perhaps it has to do with the specificity of the climbing he does most frequently. Certainly, using a smaller edge will let you train with less weight, which is easier to manage. However, for beginners, Dan recommends using bigger edges, such as 18 - 20 mm, because training on small holds takes getting used to.

As a general rule, training with bigger edges and heavy loads is known to promote muscle recruitment better, while training on small edges with lighter loads improves intramuscular coordination on small holds; ergo, you don't necessarily get stronger, but you get more skilled at pulling on small holds. However, we know there is a strong correlation between big and small edge maximum loads, so using both methods interchangeably and pushing the limits from both sides makes the most sense.

Fingerboard edge depth vs. hang intensity correlation

Figure 1: Typical hang intensity vs. edge depth correlation based on experimental data.

Selecting the training grip positions

One crucial question that's almost always asked when discussing finger strength training protocols is which grip position to use. Two aspects need to be taken into account here:

  1. Maximum force production
  2. Training specificity

Maximum force production

The first factor we need to consider is force production. According to Dr. Tyler Nelson, for off-the-wall finger strength training, we should choose the grip that produces the most force with the most finger involvement, which typically means a 4-finger grip somewhere between the half crimp and open hand position.

The grip that produces the most force with the most finger involvement is the one to prioritize.

That's consistent with the results of the 2023 publication by Ferrer-Uris et al., where they've found that using the half crimp grip results in very-high flexor digitorum profundus (FDP) and flexor digitorum superficialis (FDS) forearm muscle stimulation - see Figure 2. What is very interesting about this investigation is that they've also found that deadhanging from a big round rung, 60 mm in depth, which they call the SLOPER hold, resulted in practically the same FDP stimulation as the half crimp and significantly better FDS and FCR (flexor carpi radialis) activation.

The authors conclude that training finger strength using the sloper grip is a promising strategy to improve strength while minimizing the risk of injury. That's particularly important for novice climbers or during rehabilitation programs. The downside is that a substantially heavier load is required to achieve higher muscle activation with the sloper hold, which may make it problematic for Arm-Lifting. To reap the benefits of the sloper hold training, as discussed in the publication, weighted one-arm hangs would probably be the go-to method for most climbers.

Comparison of individual muscle sEMG activity among grip positions. FDP, flexor digitorum profundus; FDS, flexor digitorum superficialis; FCR, flexor carpi radialis; EDC, extensor digitorum communis

Figure 2: Comparison of individual muscle sEMG activity among grip positions. FDP, flexor digitorum profundus; FDS, flexor digitorum superficialis; FCR, flexor carpi radialis; EDC, extensor digitorum communis 10Ferrer-Uris, B., Arias, D., Torrado, P., Marina, M., Busquets, A., 2023. Exploring forearm muscle coordination and training applications of various grip positions during maximal isometric finger dead-hangs in rock climbers. PeerJ. (link).

Another possible grip that can be used for Arm-Lifting is the chisel. For those wondering, the chisel grip is a variation of the half crimp, where the index finger is straight and used more passively. Depending on the respective length of individual fingers, the climbers may prefer one or the other.

Comparison between the half crimp grip and the chisel grip

Figure 3: Comparison between the strict half crimp (left) and the chisel grip (right).

Still, for most climbers, using the strict half crimp with the bent index finger is considerably more challenging, and they default to the chisel when hangboarding or campusing. According to Neil Gresham, being able to climb with a strict half crimp is beneficial on certain types of holds and can give you an edge, so if your default grip is the chisel, it's worthwhile to practice the strict half crimp, even if it means you can lift less 11N. Gresham, 4 Grip Techniques For Milking The Most Out Of Handholds, www.climbing.com, May 10, 2022 (link).

In his recent YouTube video, Bossclimbs emphasizes the importance of using the strict half crimp position in his Arm-Lifting training 12www.youtube.com/@bossclimbs, How to Train the 20mm Half-Crimp ONE ARM HANG (and actually get it), Apr. 2, 2024 (link). He explains that by letting your index finger move to the chiseled position, you're not loading it evenly with the other fingers, leaving it undertrained. According to the author of the video, it's critical to make sure that you're using strict half crimp form at the cost of lifting lesser weight. The similar goes for the pinky finger - it's very difficult to prevent your smallest digit from falling into the chisel position. That's why it may be a good idea to train it separately in the half crimp.

To summarize, the importance of using the strict half crimp form while Arm-Lifting and hangboarding is still debatable. Many sources don't pay significant attention to the position of the index finger, while others claim that it's critical for your progress. However, the position of your index finger can be a good indicator of fatigue, so if you notice it straightening instead of being bent at a roughly 90° angle, it may be a good signal for you to stop the set.

Training specificity

As explained above, your primary training grip position should typically be a deep 4-finger half crimp, chisel, or open hand. However, if you're training for a project full of two-finger pockets or planning a trip to a region packed with sharp crimps, consider adding these positions to your training repertoire as a secondary grip to get the best translation to your climbing performance. On the other hand, if you don't need to focus on any particular hold position and climb mostly indoors, adding pinch training to your Arm-Lifting sessions as a secondary grip is an excellent choice. Moreover, pinch training improves wrist stabilization and carries over well to slopers.

Still, according to Tyler Nelson, any off-the-wall finger training needs to be complimented by real climbing to get the necessary coordination adaptations. Failing to do so is just a waste of time 13www.youtube.com/@thestruggleclimbingshow, How To ACTUALLY Get Stronger Fingers // Dr. Tyler Nelson, Sept. 29, 2023 (link). Although the above statement may seem controversial, I can confirm that I made the biggest finger strength gains when I paired hangboard training with regular system wall climbing 14J. Banaszczyk, StrengthClimbing – 8-Month Hangboard Finger Strength Training Program Results, Mar. 31, 2020. (link). The Finger Strength Training on the Wall protocol is a great tool to bridge the gap between fingerboard training and real rock climbing 15J. Banaszczyk, StrengthClimbing – Dr. Tyler Nelson’s New Active Finger Strength Training Protocols, Mar. 23, 2023. (link).

If you were just to stop climbing and only train finger strength off the wall, the ability to transfer that to real climbing would be zero. It's a waste of your time.

The correct lifting form

Since you're lifting a heavy load like a deadlift, you must pay attention to maintain good form. First of all, don't lift with your arm by bending it and shrugging your shoulder as if trying to row the weight - your arm strength will limit you. Instead, you want to maintain a straight back and a straight arm and keep your knees bent. Position the load in front of you with your arm resting on the front of your hip. Lift the load with your legs by straightening your knees without leaning backward - see Video 1.

Video 1: Arm-Lifting form demonstration video.

One crucial aspect is how to load your block. Pulling the mounting cord through both sides of the block puts the load vertically underneath it—see Figure 4 (left). Alternatively, you may pull the cord through one side only, which will tilt the block and feel like you’re lifting an incut edge. Doing so makes lifting easier and more stable. That’s great for crimping and makes training more predictable and immune to external conditions, such as heat and humidity.

Two ways to mount the Arm-Lifting block - level edge and tilted edge.

Figure 4: Mounting cord pulled through both sides - flat edge (left). Mounting cord pulled through one side - incut edge (right).

Lift duration and rest interval

Regarding the lifting interval, you may choose short lifts, which Yves Gravelle prefers, or static lifts, where you hold the weight for a longer time. Longer lifts, lasting 5 - 30 seconds, resemble regular hangboarding and can be programmed as such. You may copy MaxHang or Density Hang protocols and apply them directly 16J. Banaszczyk, StrengthClimbing – Dr. Tyler Nelson’s Density Hangs Finger Training For Rock Climbing, Feb. 28, 2022. (link).

To me, however, performing short, heavy lifts seems more appealing. First of all, it’s something completely different from what we’re used to as climbers. Since it takes about a second for the fingers to develop maximum contraction (see Figure 5), it makes sense from the recruitment point of view to make the reps short and as heavy as possible. This approach is sometimes used for hangboarding but is uncommon and rarely discussed. The idea is to use a heavy weight and hang from the fingerboard for 2 - 3 seconds, just enough to stabilize the hang, and then dismount.

Force production recorded during Arm Lifting

Figure 5: Force production recorded while lifting a 36 kg load - reaching peak force takes 1 - 1.5 seconds.

Maximum load testing

One of the most important aspects of strength training programming is setting the correct training load, number of repetitions, and sets. What's great about Arm-Lifting is that it's possible to apply well-known weightlifting training methodologies directly. The first thing you need to do is measure the maximum lifting load. That will allow you to program your training and also serve as a benchmark for gauging your progress. You can either figure out your absolute 100% lifting maximum (1 RM) or determine the maximum you can lift for a prescribed number of repetitions.

You can use your hangboarding metrics to approximate the right maximum load. For example, if you can do a -5 kg assisted one-arm hang on the BM2K middle rung, you'll likely be able to do an 18 - 20 mm Arm-Lift close to your weight minus 5 kg 17www.beastmaker.co.uk (link). However, according to Dan, since the blocks are suspended and, for this reason, slightly unstable, the force transfer is worse, and your lifting load will likely be in the 80 - 90% range of your one-arm hang, especially if you're new to Arm-Lifting.

To verify this, I compared the load I could hang one-armed on the V-ring to what I could pull (lift). To perform both measurements, I used the Tindeq Progressor. The result was that I could pull 92 - 94% of my maximum hang load for both my left and right hand. However, when Yves Gravelle took the Lattice Training one-arm hang test, his result was 100 kg, the same as his Arm-Lifting maximum.

Table 1: Arm-Lift load vs. One-Arm Hang load comparison.

One-Arm Hang load vs. Arm-Lift load
YvesJędrzej
Arm-Lift100 kg65 kg
One-Arm Hang100 kg69 kg
Ratio100%94%
Bodyweight68 kg67 kg
Load/BW147%97%
Bouldering gradeV15V7

If your Arm-Lift is significantly stronger than your One-Arm Hang, it could mean that you have some shoulder and pull-up strength deficits. If so, Arm-Lifting may not be the best exercise for you because it could further aggravate that imbalance and lead to injury. That issue is further explored in the r/climbharder discussion on weighted hangboarding vs. Arm-Lifting 18Weighted Hangboard vs. Arm Lifting with a Small Edge, r/climbharder, Dec. 8, 2023 (link).

The second approach is determining your 3 - 5 repetitions maximum (3 - 5 RM), as Dan shows in the Hooper's Beta video. This method is undeniably safer and should be preferred, especially for beginners. It also makes sense since you will perform sets of multiple repetitions throughout your training. Furthermore, if you want to know your one repetition maximum (1RM), you can use one of the calculators available on the web 19One Rep Max (1RM) Calculator, nasm.org (link)20One Rep Max Calculator, strengthlevel.com (link). Depending on the model, the 5 RM is around 86 - 89% of your 1 RM.

Whatever method you choose, it all comes down to lifting heavy, so it’s best to use an incremental approach and add the load stepwise. This way, you won’t hurt yourself, but you’ll also get a more meaningful result as you recruit the finger muscles with each progressively heavier lift. In the video, Dan walks you through the entire process and below is a breakdown:

  1. Estimate your 1 RM, e.g., 100 lbs - based on hangboard numbers.
  2. Set your load to 50% (50 lbs) and perform 5 - 10 warm-up lifts.
  3. Rest 30 - 60 seconds.
  4. Add 2 - 20 lbs, depending on how hard the lifts felt.
  5. Perform three lifts - the number is reduced to save your strength and assess how much load to add.
  6. Keep working in this incremental fashion until the lifts start feeling hard.
  7. When you feel like you’re ready for the final attempt, take a longer rest (3 - 5 min.).
  8. Determine your 3 RM (you should fail on the 4th rep).

It's important to stress that failure doesn't necessarily mean the block pops out of your hand. It could also be "form failure" when you struggle to complete a repetition or are unable to maintain a strict half crimp without "chiseling" your index finger.

Remember that it's critical that you recover completely from your previous training before doing maximum strength testing. I noticed that if I don't rest two or three days after a long endurance session of a full day at the crag my lifting numbers can be lower by up to 15% compared with my regular max!

Finally, the easiest and most reliable method of determining your pulling maximum is to fix the block to the ground with a cord and use the Tindeq Progressor to get an instant and reliable reading.

Training session structure

Now that you’ve determined your maximum lifting loads, you can apply this result to design your training session. Dan provides an example session in the video, but note that he refers to 5 RM as the 100% lifting load because that's the maximum load he uses in the session, not because it's the maximum he could lift. Below is the breakdown of the lifting session for a single chosen training position.

  1. Warm-up: 1 - 2 sets of 8 reps at 50% 5RM
  2. Ramp-set: 5 reps 65% 5RM
  3. Ramp set: 5 reps at 80% 5RM
  4. Ramp set: 3 - 5 reps at 90% 5RM
  5. Work set: 5 reps at 100% 5RM

Perform 3 - 10 work sets, 3 - 8 reps each. As you become more familiar with the program and decide to progress in volume, you may add another grip position.

In the Lattice Training video, Yves Gravelle provides a similar session structure. First, he recommends determining your lifting max by a 5 - 7-second lift, which is similar to traditional MVC-7 measurements on the fingerboard. That’s relatively conservative but reduces the likelihood of getting injured. Next Yves performs the following sets:

  1. Set 1: 8 reps at 50% MVC-7
  2. Set 2: 8 reps at 60% MVC-7
  3. Set 3: 8 reps at 70% MVC-7
  4. Sets 4 - 7: 4 reps at 80% MVC-7

Yves explains that on a good day, he may opt to do more reps, but if he feels weak, he may do less or quit the session early. Not being able to pull hard is also a good indicator that you’re not adapting well to your training - most likely, you’re training too hard and too often or not recovering well.

The approach used by Dan and Yves is called the Flat Pyramid and is one of the best loading patterns for maximizing strength gains - see Figure 6. According to Dr. Tudor Bompa, who is a world-renown sports scientist and author of the book “Periodization Training for Sports”, thanks to the high number of total repetitions performed at high loads, it develops maximum strength and also triggers some hypertrophy specific to fast-twitch fibers. The physiological advantage of the flat pyramid is that using a fixed intensity load leads to the best neuromuscular adaptation for maximum strength without confusing the body with several intensities 21T. Bompa, C. Buzzichelli, Periodization Training for Sports, Third Edition, Human Kinetics, Feb. 2015 (link).

Flat pyramid loading pattern for Arm-Lifting finger strength training

Figure 6: Flat pyramid pattern according to “Periodization Training for Sports” by Dr. Tudor Bompa.

As a rule of thumb, 70 - 80% of your max is a good range for strength training. Dan Beall’s program uses loads in the 80 - 90% range of 1 RM (3 - 5 RM). Yves Gravelle uses similar loads - typically 80% of 1 RM, seldom 90 - 95%. This is no coincidence, and Dr. Bompa addresses this matter in his book. According to the authors, until not long ago, coaches and training methodologists widely considered zones 2 and 1 (loads from 85% and up) to be the best training zones for eliciting maximum strength gains. However, the strength training focus recently shifted from zone 1 loads (over 90%) to zone 3 loads (70 - 80%). The field experience has shown that:

  • Most neuromuscular system adaptations necessary to increase maximum strength involve loads lower than 90% of 1RM.
  • Exposure time to loads of 90% or higher, necessary to elicit adaptations specific to that intensity range, should be very short.

However, there are occasions when Yves trains with higher loads, reaching 90 - 95% of his max. These are exceptional cases when he’s preparing for a specific event. If so, he’ll do fewer sets and one or two reps. What’s also worth mentioning is that Yves never goes to complete failure - he always pays attention to leaving one or two reps in the tank.

Always perform finger strength and power training at the beginning of the training session—never leave it for last.

You can integrate Arm-Lifting into your regular climbing sessions and treat it as finger recruitment training before limit-bouldering. It is important that you don’t leave finger strength training for last and always do it before climbing, right after warming up. Such sessions are best done 2 - 3 days a week. Exceeding this number will likely lead to diminishing returns. Mixing Arm-Lifting with MaxHangs to vary the training stimulus is also perfectly okay.

Training cycle progression programming

Now you have a well-designed Arm-Lifting training session. The big question is how to set up a reliable program to make you progressively stronger. There are generally three variables you can progress:

  1. Volume - number of repetitions or sets
  2. Intensity - weight
  3. Hold duration

As said before, it’s probably best to use Arm-Lifting for multiple short lifts, so I will leave the hold duration out of the discussion and focus on the first two points. Again, Dan Beall comes to aid with his simple progression program. The easiest way to progress is to increase the number of sets. For example, if your 5 RM is 100 lbs, you can go:

  • Week 1: 3 sets of 5 x 100 lbs
  • Week 2: 5 sets of 5 x 100 lbs
  • Week 3: 7 sets of 5 x 100 lbs

Once you reach over five sets, you may add weight every one or two weeks. Go for small increments, like 2.5 lbs per week.

  • Week 1: 5 sets of 5 x 100 lbs
  • Week 2: 5 sets of 5 x 102.5 lbs
  • Week 3: 5 sets of 5 x 105 lbs

You may continue progressing in this fashion for a fairly long time, like 4 - 6 weeks, especially if you’re new to the exercise, taking advantage of noob gains. Once this method stops yielding meaningful improvements, it’s probably time to switch to a mixed approach, combining adding weight with increasing the volume. At this point, consider talking to an experienced coach who can tailor a program to your needs. However, Dan suggests that you may first try the training program shown in Figure 7.

advanced arm-lifting program for finger strength

Figure 7: Advanced Arm-Lifting training program by Dan Beall from Hooper's Beta video.

The idea is first to increase the training volume for a given load and then push the volume back while increasing the load. Once you complete such a program, you may either start over or, better yet, switch to something else, like fingerboarding or campusing.

Arm-Lifting finger strength training for rock climbers - summary

Arm-lifting is a great finger-strength training alternative to weighted fingerboarding:

  • It’s a different training stimulus, so you may expect rapid finger strength gains if this is your first time doing it.
  • Performing multiple short lifts targets finger recruitment and is less fatiguing than regular hangs of longer duration.
  • It makes it possible to effectively isolate finger training from your shoulders, but you need to be careful not to create a significant strength imbalance, which could lead to injury.
  • It makes training weaker finger positions (micro crimps, two-finger pockets, monos) simple. No need to use pulleys to reduce your bodyweight.
  • Programming is simple, and you may follow standard weightlifting methodologies.
  • For large edge training (18 - 20 mm), a lot of weight may be required (even 100 kg). Using a Tindeq Progressor is an excellent alternative, facilitating testing and training.

Arm-Lifting can be easily integrated into your regular climbing sessions as part of your finger recruitment routine. Remember, never leave finger strength training for after the climbing session. Instead, ensure you're well warmed up, and that your fingers are prepared to work with maximum effort.

References

  • 1
    www.youtube.com/@c4hp, Finger Strength Training 4 Rock Climbing (No Hanging Required!), Sept. 6, 2023. (link)
  • 2
    J. Banaszczyk, StrengthClimbing – Eva López MaxHangs Hangboard Routine For Finger Strength, Apr. 29, 2019. (link)
  • 3
    J. Banaszczyk, StrengthClimbing – Hangboard Repeaters strength endurance protocol, Apr. 8, 2019. (link)
  • 4
    tindeq.com/product/progressor (link)
  • 5
    www.youtube.com/@HoopersBeta, How to Train Finger Strength for Climbing [Block Pulls Guide], Apr. 24, 2023 (link)
  • 6
    tindeq.com/product/v-rings/ (link)
  • 7
    tensionclimbing.com/product/the-block-2/ (link)
  • 8
    shop.blocshop.com/products/v-mobs (link)
  • 9
    www.youtube.com/@LatticeTraining, YVES UNCUT, Feb. 27, 2023 (link)
  • 10
    Ferrer-Uris, B., Arias, D., Torrado, P., Marina, M., Busquets, A., 2023. Exploring forearm muscle coordination and training applications of various grip positions during maximal isometric finger dead-hangs in rock climbers. PeerJ. (link)
  • 11
    N. Gresham, 4 Grip Techniques For Milking The Most Out Of Handholds, www.climbing.com, May 10, 2022 (link)
  • 12
    www.youtube.com/@bossclimbs, How to Train the 20mm Half-Crimp ONE ARM HANG (and actually get it), Apr. 2, 2024 (link)
  • 13
    www.youtube.com/@thestruggleclimbingshow, How To ACTUALLY Get Stronger Fingers // Dr. Tyler Nelson, Sept. 29, 2023 (link)
  • 14
    J. Banaszczyk, StrengthClimbing – 8-Month Hangboard Finger Strength Training Program Results, Mar. 31, 2020. (link)
  • 15
    J. Banaszczyk, StrengthClimbing – Dr. Tyler Nelson’s New Active Finger Strength Training Protocols, Mar. 23, 2023. (link)
  • 16
    J. Banaszczyk, StrengthClimbing – Dr. Tyler Nelson’s Density Hangs Finger Training For Rock Climbing, Feb. 28, 2022. (link)
  • 17
    www.beastmaker.co.uk (link)
  • 18
    Weighted Hangboard vs. Arm Lifting with a Small Edge, r/climbharder, Dec. 8, 2023 (link)
  • 19
    One Rep Max (1RM) Calculator, nasm.org (link)
  • 20
    One Rep Max Calculator, strengthlevel.com (link)
  • 21
    T. Bompa, C. Buzzichelli, Periodization Training for Sports, Third Edition, Human Kinetics, Feb. 2015 (link)
Enjoying the site? Please subscribe to the Premium Content to support it!
Reviews from my clients and collaborators:

Recent posts

Share this post

Rate this article

5/5

About the author

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Almost there...

Get updates on upcoming posts